The Best Ryzen 5000 Series Zen 3 CPUs

We Take A Closer Look At AMD's Impressive Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 series CPUs

Best Ryzen 5000

AMD’s highly anticipated Ryzen 5000 series CPUs were finally unveiled recently, with Dr. Su ensuring us that their release date of the 5th of November will not be a let down – no disrespect Nvidia.

The new Zen 3 lineup consists of all the usual players, taking on the Intel alternative in gaming, workstations tasks, and overall value for money. We see the latest series of Ryzen 5000 series CPUs utilize a new Zen architecture, bringing with it a higher max boost frequency, significant IPC uplift, and a new core layout – all designed to move AMD even closer to the CPU hierarchy top spot.

The following article will be a closer look at some of the standout CPUs in the lineup, exploring their best features and deciding whether they’re better (or worse) than the blue competition.

So, with plenty to get through, let’s waste no further time and dive straight into it!

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The Best Ryzen 5000 Series CPU

Best Workstation Ryzen 5000 Series CPU

Best High-End Workstation Ryzen CPU

The Best Ryzen 5000 Series CPUs

Editors Choice

The Best Ryzen 5000 Series CPU
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4.9/5
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Whilst the Ryzen 5900X isn’t the most powerful CPU in this list, I still feel it shows the greatest value for money – offering up similar gaming performance to that of the 5950X.

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Best Workstation Ryzen 5000 Series CPU

Best High-End Workstation Ryzen CPU
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4.9/5
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AMD is branding the Ryzen 9 5950X as the “best of both worlds” CPU – and you can see why. This 16 core/32 thread processor pretty much does it all. Gaming, workstation tasks, and major overclocking – what more could you want?

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Best Mid-Range Gaming Ryzen CPU

A High-Performance Gaming CPU That Won't Break The Bank
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4.7/5
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If you can’t quite stomach the cost that comes with the 5950X or 5900X, the Ryzen 7 5800X offers up plenty of gaming performance without destroying your bank balance.

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Best Budget Ryzen CPU

A Great Budget Ryzen CPU For Gaming
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For individuals who are more budget-restricted, the Ryzen 5 5600X is one of the most exciting options to come out of the new Zen 3 lineup. It really does tick a lot of the right boxes.

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How We Choose

Choosing new hardware is never easy. It usually involves hours of intense product research, user feedback, and a whole host of other considerations to get anywhere close to a definitive decision.

If you aren’t tech-savvy and struggle to put the time aside to go through the above requirements, you may end up purchasing a piece of hardware that simply isn’t right for your specific needs.

Fear not though, friends! Here at WePC, we like to take the stress of research away, and transform the whole process into an easy-to-follow, complete buyers guide. That’s right, our team of PC enthusiasts has done all the hard work for you!

Ryzen 5000 Series CPUs: Things To Consider

Understanding the fundamental specifications of a CPU is one of the most important steps in ensuring that your next processor is right for your bespoke needs. Processors are one of the most important hardware components you can purchase, having an effect on everything from gaming to boot times and everything in between.

In the following section, we’ll be looking at the main things to consider when looking to purchase a new Ryzen 5000 series CPU.

Cores And Threads

As you’ll probably already know, modern CPUs are made up of cores and threads. Cores are the physical processors that make up your CPU. In comparison, a thread is a virtual core that is designed to help alleviate some of the potential strain brought on by CPU intensive workloads.

Modern-day CPUs come to the table boasting a variety of different core and thread counts, with more generally being better when it comes to workstation tasks. Despite gaming only requiring minimal amounts of core performance, we still recommend at least 4 cores for modern gaming.

Below is a rough guideline that will help you decide how many cores/threads you actually need:

  • 4 Cores – General use, light browsing, and very light gaming
  • 8 Cores – Decent for gaming, moderate multi-tasking, and all general-use purposes
  • 12-16 Cores + – Enthusiast level CPU. Handles pretty much everything you can throw at it. Very good for rendering, multi-tasking, and other CPU intensive processes

Clock Speed

Clock speed, or clock frequency, is often looked at as one of the deciding factors when it comes to overall performance – and that is only half true. Clock frequency (sometimes referred to as cycle speed) refers to how many cycles a core will perform every second. It’s the physical speed of each of your CPU’s cores and is measured in gigahertz (GHz).

Whilst that sounds fairly straight forward, manufacturers like to throw a spanner in the works by adding several clock frequencies to a single processor. CPUs now come with a base, boost, single-core boost, and max all-core boost frequencies. Whilst this sounds a little daunting, it isn’t actually that hard to get your head around.

The base clock frequency refers to the out of the box clock speed when under very little load. Boost frequency kicks in when you start a task that requires processing power from the CPU – raising the clock speed to increase performance. Single-core boost refers to the maximum clock frequency of a single core, whilst max all-core frequency refers to the maximum frequency all cores can reach simultaneously.

Clock frequency variants aside, all you need to know is that higher is often better – but not always needed for certain tasks and workflows.

Cores And Clock Speed Combined

Whilst both core count and clock frequency are equally as important on their own, many would argue that a combination of the two specifications is more desirable. Luckily, AMD consumers have been treated to a strong mix of these two important specifications since Ryzen launched back in 2017.

AMD are renowned for bringing a high core count and fast clock frequency to the table, allowing their CPU lineups to far exceed Intel’s in the multitasking department.

That being said, here are some rough guidelines for understanding the needs of common tasks like gaming and rendering:

  • Gaming – Gaming has moved away from CPU demand over the years, relying more prominently on the GPU for its performance. That said, we recommend at least 4 cores for modern gaming with a base clock speed of 3.5GHz.
  • Workstation – Rendering and video editing are quite different. More cores and threads allow the CPU to perform tasks in a much more efficient manner. We recommend 8+ cores for workstation tasks with a base clock of 3.0GHz and above.

Does My Motherboard Support Ryzen 5000 Series?

One of the big factors you must consider before purchasing a new Ryzen 5000 series CPU is whether or not your motherboard will accommodate the new Zen 3 processors. Luckily, AMD has stayed true to their word, and have designed the new CPUs using the AM4 socket type. Intel consumers do not get the same luxury.

That being said, users will still have to perform a BIOS update to ensure the Ryzen 5000 series CPU is compatible with 400 series motherboards. AMD suggests updating the BIOS on 500 series boards to ensure maximum efficiency.

TDP

For the most part, TDP is merely a marketing figure, useful for very few scenarios. It also can’t be used as a comparison between Intel and AMD – as they both use a different formula to work out their unique TDP.

Having said that, TDP stands for thermal design power and is the maximum amount of heat generated by that part. Whilst it gives us a rough idea of how much power the part will require, it is used more commonly used to determine which cooler you’ll need.

Best Ryzen 5000 Series Zen 3 CPU

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Best Workstation Ryzen 5000 Series CPU

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Best Mid-Range Gaming Ryzen CPU

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Best Budget Ryzen CPU

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Editors Choice

The Best Ryzen 5000 Series CPU
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Tech Specs

Speed

3.7GHz/ 4.8GHz

Core (Threads)

12/24

Socket

AM4

TDP

105W

Pros

Excellent Value For Money

Great gaming performance

Fantastic Multi-core performance

Compatible with 400/500 series AM4 motherboards

Cons

Overkill for many scenarios

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For me, the best overall CPU in the new Ryzen 5000 series lineup has to be the Ryzen 9 5900X. Whilst it may not be the most powerful CPU in terms of workstation tasks, it certainly offers the greatest value for money when referencing gaming scenarios. With 12 cores/24 threads and the ability to all-core boost to 4.8GHz, the Ryzen 9 5900X ticks a lot of the right boxes.

This CPU comes equipped with a base clock frequency of 3.7GHz, a drop of 100MHz when compared to last year’s flagship Ryzen 9 3900X. That being said, it still manages a performance increase of 28% in demanding titles like Shadow of the Tomb Raider. More impressively, CPU intensive titles such as League of Legends and CS:GO saw an increase of up to 50% when comparing the generational CPUs. Pretty impressive.

The Ryzen 9 5900X also comes equipped with 6MB L2 cache, 64MB l3 cache, and is a 105W TDP part – exactly the same as last year’s Ryzen 9 3900XT. That’s all wrapped up in TSMC’s 7nm process node and is, yet again, backward compatible with 400/500 series motherboard – via a BIOS update.

A fantastic CPU that really does offer the best of both worlds.

 

Best Workstation Ryzen 5000 Series CPU

Best High-End Workstation Ryzen CPU
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Tech Specs

Speed

3.4GHz/ 4.9GHz

Core (Threads)

16/32

Socket

AM4

TDP

105W

Pros

The best multi-core workstation performance

Destroys any similarly priced Intel alternative

Backward compatible with AM4 400/500 series motherboards

Great Gaming Performance

Cons

High-end price tag

Overkill for many scenarios

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As far as workstation performance goes, you’ll be hard-pressed to find anything more suited to the job than the Ryen 9 5950X in today’s market. It not only destroys the previous iteration, but it also outperforms any Intel equivalent – almost putting their 10980XE to the sword as well.

The Ryzen 9 5950X is AMD’s new high-performance 16 core, 32 thread processor – offering up an all-core boost frequency of 4.9GHz and a combined cache of 72MB (L2+L3). This is a 105W TDP part, giving it a significant IPC increase and greater efficiency as well. Whilst we still consider the 5950X massively overkill for a gaming PC, it still offers up very good gaming performance in the greater scheme of things.

In terms of workstation performance, the Ryzen 9 5950X offers up impressive stats, especially when compared to the Intel i9-10900K. AMD has boasted a 59% increase in V-Ray rendering and double-digit improvements when looking at video editing and compiling.

With its ability to fit right into your existing 400/500 series motherboard, the Ryzen 5 5950X really is hard to dismiss.

Best Mid-Range Gaming Ryzen CPU

A High-Performance Gaming CPU That Won't Break The Bank
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Tech Specs

Speed

3.8GHz/ 4.7GHz

Core (Threads)

8/16

Socket

AM4

TDP

105W

Pros

Excellent single-core performance

Displays good value for money

Backwards compatible

Cons

Not as powerful as other options in this guide

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For the gamer who’s less interested in workstation tasks and focuses more on raw gaming performance, the Ryzen 7 5800X is a superb choice. It offers up excellent value for money and – if rumors are to be believed – should outperform the Intel equivalent on release day.

The Ryzen 7 5800X comes equipped with 8 cores/16 threads, a base clock frequency of 3.8GHz, and a combined cache of 36MB (L2+L3). Like the other CPUs in this guide, the Ryzen 7 5800X is designed using the TSMC’s 7nm node and is fully backward compatible with 400/500 series AM4 motherboards – albeit requiring a BIOS update.

As far as gaming performance is concerned, we should expect to see excellent 1080p and 1440p gaming on ultra settings. Even highly taxing CPU games shouldn’t cause this CPU too many issues.

Whilst this CPU doesn’t really land a blow on the more premium offerings in this guide, it still has the ability to perform fairly taxing workflows. For me, one of the best value CPUs on the market.

Best Budget Ryzen CPU

Best Budget Ryzen CPU
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Tech Specs

Speed

3.7GHz/ 4.6GHz

Core (Threads)

6/12

Socket

AM4

TDP

65W

Pros

Affordable price point

Good gaming performance

High overclocking potential

Cons

Not the best for workstation tasks

Not as powerful as others in this guide

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Last but not least, we have the budget option – AMD’s Ryzen 5 5600X. Despite this being the slowest and least powerful of the CPUs in this guide, it still has a lot to offer today’s market. It falls slap bang in the middle of a super-competitive price pool, giving consumers another tough decision when it comes to their next CPU upgrade.

The Ryzen 5 5600X comes equipped with everything you’d need for a quality gaming experience – including 6 cores/12 threads, a boost clock frequency of 3.7GHz, max all-core boost of 4.6GHz, and 35MB of combined cache (L2+L3). Once again, this CPU is built on TSMC’s 7nm node and is fully backwards compatible with 400/500 series AM4 motherboards.

Despite this CPU not showcasing the best workstation performance, it still offers up a great gaming experience for individuals on a tight budget. This card is set to hit shelves for around $300, pricing it above the 10600K alternative. That being said, AMD has stated that we should see a performance increase when comparing it to one of Intel’s most popular CPUs – the 10600K.

Only time will tell, but for now, it’s safe to say that this could be one of the best CPUs of 2021.

Does Ryzen 5000 Perform Better With Faster RAM?

Previous generations of Ryzen tell us that faster speeds of memory are the way to go when trying to extract the most performance. The sweet spot for the Ryzen 3000 series was DDR4-3600MHz, with that number rising once again for the Ryzen 5000 series.

A leaked slide, reportedly from AMD, hints that faster memory support will be available with Ryzen 5000 series processors. It goes on to detail a new standard for the sweet spot of memory performance, landing on DDR4-4000MHz. This new level of memory speed will likely see greater performance gains in both gaming and workstation scenarios.

Final Word

So, there you have it guys, our comprehensive guide on the best Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. Hopefully, this guide has given you a better understanding of the 5000 series lineup and what scenario each processor is best suited towards. Whilst the lineup is currently only 4 CPUs, it’s safe to say that AMD have more SKUs in the works. It’s only a matter of time before the remaining SKUs are released – potentially bringing some changes to this guide.

If you have any questions regarding the Ryzen 5000 series CPU lineup, feel free to leave us a comment in the section below. Better still, why not head on over to our Community Hub where you can discuss everything Ryzen related with like-minded individuals.