Finding The Best RAM For Ryzen 3000 – 2021 Reviews and Top Picks

Getting your RAM choice right at the start can really boost your performance

Best Ram For Ryzen 3000

AMD Ryzen 3000 is finally here! Now that PC builders can get their hands on these brand spanking new chips; many are asking the question – what is the best RAM for Ryzen 3000?

Alongside the new Zen 2 CPUs, we saw the release of the new x570 motherboards which support very fast clock speeds. Of course higher hertz RAM of 4666 MHz, which these new boards support, comes at a high cost, and even optimum speed RAM (3733MHz) for the new chipset can be quite pricey when looking at RAM kits with CL14 or CL16. It’s these expensive price tags that make getting the best value so crucial for the price-conscious gamer.

You can always overclock your RAM regardless of what kit you buy, but AMD recommends customers go with DDR4-3600MHz CL16 for the best results in terms of price to performance. If you have a hole burning in your pocket and don’t mind splashing that cash, then AMD recommends going with 3733MHz as it’s considered to be the sweet spot.

The higher, the better right? Well yes, and no, many B450 boards support up to 3466MHz; however, the new x570’s can smash up to 4666MHz, so it is important to note which speeds your system supports.

In this article, we are going to breakdown some of the best RAM choices you can buy right now for Ryzen 3000 with an eye on speed and CAS timings. We are also going to look at the best ‘plug and play’ options for those that don’t want to tweak or overclock.

Our Top Picks

01
Editor's Choice
Loading...

Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3200MHz

Pure performance, zero bling
Loading...
Loading...
02
Editor's Choice
Loading...

Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB

Enthusiast grade RAM for the masses
Loading...
Loading...
03
Runner Up
Loading...

Kingston HyperX Predator Black

Loading...
Loading...

Breakdown

01
Editor's Choice
Pure performance, zero bling
Loading...

Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3200MHz

0 /5
Editor's Rating
Loading...
02
Editor's Choice
Enthusiast grade RAM for the masses
Loading...

Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB

0 /5
Editor's Rating
Loading...
03
Runner Up
Loading...

Kingston HyperX Predator Black

0 /5
Editor's Rating
Loading...
04
RGB Choice
Loading...

Corsair Vengence Pro RGB

0 /5
Editor's Rating
Loading...
05
Budget Option
Loading...

Patriot Viper 4 Series

0 /5
Editor's Rating
Loading...

Things to Consider

CAS Latency

Column Access Strobe (CAS) latency, or CL, is the delay time of your RAM receiving a command and then being able to issue it. The numbers for the timings will look something like this 15-17-17-35. Those numbers indicate how many clock cycles it takes for the RAM to respond to the command.

Your memory timings determine how fast your RAM will respond to a command, this being said, faster MHz RAM with slower CAS timings might actually be slower than lower MHz RAM with faster CAS timings.

Finding That Optimal Speed

With early gen Ryzen, the clock on your memory was synchronized one to one with the infinity fabric (AMD’s proprietary system that facilitates data and control transmission across all linked components). Basically, if your memory were at 2133MHz, your infinity fabric would be 1066MHz (DDR = double data rate). Following this it means the higher your RAM speed, the higher your infinity fabric, however, this can become unstable on the older chips at around 4000MHz.

With the introduction of Zen 2, the memory is decoupled at a certain point with ease (the 3733MHz mark). Once this point is crossed the speed you get is halved, and it is here where we start to see some latency. This latency may be minuscule, but it has been shown to affect gameplay.

The Best RAM For Ryzen 3000

01
Editor's Choice
Loading...

Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3200MHz

Capacity

4GB – 16GB

Frequency

DDR4 2400Mhz – 4000Mhz

CAS Latency

16

02
Editor's Choice
Loading...

Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB

Capacity

16GB – 64GB

Frequency

DDR4 3600MHz – 4266MHz

CAS Latency

18-19

03
Runner Up
Loading...

Kingston HyperX Predator Black

Capacity

4GB – 16GB

Frequency

DDR4 2400MHz – 4133MHz

Cas Latency

18

04
RGB Choice
Loading...
05
Budget Option
Loading...

In-depth Review

01
Editor's Choice
Loading...

Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3200MHz

Capacity

4GB – 16GB

Frequency

DDR4 2400Mhz – 4000Mhz

CAS Latency

16

Pros

Excellent over clocking capability

Smaller than other RAM

Powerful RAM

Cons

Limited capacity at higher speeds

No RGB if that’s your thing

Corsair’s Vengence LPX RAM is some of the most reliable on the market and its lower price point makes it quite an attractive option to those who aren’t fussed about RGB lighting.

The performance from these RAM kits is fantastic and they solid overclocking potential to boot. This level of performance is achieved thanks to the pure aluminum heat spreader which can disperse heat efficiently. Unfortunately, the single stick capacity seems to be 8GB but this is more than enough for the average gamer looking to slam in 16-32 GB of 3600MHz RAM.

If you are someone who doesn’t mind the plain look of these solid RAM kits then you are getting a good price to performance deal here, however, don’t worry you can always get the Vengence RGB Pros for a flashy alternative.

02
Editor's Choice
Loading...

Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB

Capacity

16GB – 64GB

Frequency

DDR4 3600MHz – 4266MHz

CAS Latency

18-19

Pros

Powerful RAM

Dual-channel DHX cooling

High speed and tight timings

Unique design

Cons

Quite Bulky

The Dominator Platinum RAM kit from Corsair features all the same principles as the LPX kit, however, we see the inclusion of B-die and a higher amount of overclocking ability thanks to the impressive heat spreader.

Corsair’s Dominator Platinum DDR4 is the true premium range with ample overclocking room for enthusiasts. The aluminum construction is second to none and with its iconic design you are looking at a serious bit of RAM here.

With prices slashed at the moment, there has never been a better time to get that speedy RAM to go with your new Ryzen 3000 chip but as mentioned this is tailored, more towards enthusiasts who want to push their system to the absolute limits with overclocking. If the price doesn’t scare you off then these are certainly worth a look however for a budget approach consider the Vengence LPX kit as an alternative!

03
Runner Up
Loading...

Kingston HyperX Predator Black

Capacity

4GB – 16GB

Frequency

DDR4 2400MHz – 4133MHz

Cas Latency

18

Pros

Backed by a lifetime warranty

Fantastic performance

Relatively low profile

Cons

Expensive

The Kingston HyperX Predators feature great overclocking potential with their new heat spreader design which does a great job of heat reduction (and looks cool too). The Predator’s smash the Fury’s in performance and are available in quite a wide variety of sizes and frequencies.

The Predators come in a 3600MHz kit, which is what AMD recommends. Although it isn’t available right now you can purchase these in a 4133MHz frequency with little difference in CAS latency and is something theRyzen 3000 can handle with ease.

Kingston HyperX offers a solid selection of RAM kits however they are considered a bit pricey for what you get.

04
RGB Choice
Loading...

Pros

Powerful RAM

Tight Response Times

Vibrant RGB

Cons

Expensive

Corsair’s Vengence Pro RGB RAM is one of the more eye-catching RAM kits you can buy and that is largely down to its bright RGB display coming from the top of the heat sink. You are paying a bit more for the privilege of the lighting but it does look fantastic in a tempered glass case.

Speeds from this range start at 2666MHz but for the new Ryzen 3000 CPUs, you are going to want to be aiming for the 3600MHz although a minimum of 3200MHz is perfectly fine if you are on a budget. This range is considered premium from Corsair and of course, they are compatible with the intuitive iCUE software.

You can only pick these up with a minimum size of 16GB which is advised anyway to the new Ryzen chip holders and if you don’t mind parting that extra for RGB these are a solid choice that can only benefit your upgraded system.

05
Budget Option
Loading...

Pros

Great performance

Low profile

Relatively inexpensive

Cons

Not as reliable as other brands

The Patriot Viper 4 series offers the budget gamer an option of higher hertz RAM. Despite being the least reliable on the list they are a solid budget choice and offer some great performance. This RAM kit from Patriot sits in that all-important speed range for the new Ryzen 3000 chips and even though it didn’t outperform the other standout brands in the benchmarks its lower price still makes it an appealing choice.

The design is fairly awful if we are being honest but for those out there where design isn’t everything you are getting some decent value here leaving a sizeable amount for a different component/ upgrade.

This affordable kit, when paired with the new-gen Ryzen chips, will see some significant performance boosts like the others and it will do it at a fraction of the price.

Final Word

The new Ryzen chips are capable of much more than DDR4-3600MHz RAM, and it has become much easier to achieve stable higher frequencies.

With AMD firmly in the lead now when it comes to processors, it has become crucial to take a closer look at RAM since Ryzen based systems benefit from faster RAM.

Although CAS latency isn’t the be all and end all of your RAM, it is essential to get timings as low as possible, but this can incur higher costs. The difference isn’t that noticeable if we are being honest, so a CAS timing of 17, 18, or even 19 isn’t going to ruin your gameplay.

It is worth noting that 3200MHz RAM will also benefit your Ryzen system and may be much more affordable to the APU builders out there or anyone on a strict budget. We are going to see the introduction of the all-new G.Skill Trident Z Neo RAM too which will offer lighting quick speeds with even tighter timings.

Overall the benefits to much quicker RAM aren’t so significant your system will be terrible it is just in your best interest to get the fastest RAM you can for your new Ryzen build.

The Author Who Worked On This Article